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    Elbow Pain, Cause & Treatment

Elbow

Your Elbow like any joint in the human body that is hurting it is most often caused by over use. Many sports, hobbies and jobs require repetitive hand, wrist or arm movements. Elbow pain may occasionally be due to arthritis, but in general, your elbow joint is much less prone to wear-and-tear damage than are many other joints.

Common causes of Elbow Pain include:  Elbow | Launchfit™ by Clinicube®

Broken Arm

A broken arm involves one or more of the three bones in your arm — the ulna, radius and humerus. One of the most common causes of a broken arm is falling onto an outstretched hand. If you think you or your child has broken an arm, seek prompt medical attention. It’s important to treat a fracture as soon as possible for proper healing.

Treatment depends on the site and severity of the injury. A simple break might be treated with a sling, ice and rest. However, the bone may require realignment (reduction) in the emergency room.

A more complicated break might require surgery to realign the broken bone and to implant wires, plates, nails or screws to keep the bone in place during healing.

Bursitis

Is a painful condition that affects the small, fluid-filled sacs — called bursae (bur-SEE) — that cushion the bones, tendons and muscles near your joints. Bursitis occurs when bursae become inflamed. These sacs are also located in the Elbow and when they get inflamed you have a lot of pain.

The most common treatment is rest and exercise when needed. Prevention is also a form of treatment by protecting the elbow with frequent breaks when in use. Doing stretching and warm up exercises, just to name a few.

Dislocated Elbow

occurs when the bones that make up the joint are forced out of alignment — typically when you land on an outstretched hand during a fall. The elbow is the second most commonly dislocated joint after the shoulder in adults, and the most commonly dislocated joint in children.

Toddlers may experience a dislocated elbow, sometimes known as nursemaid’s elbow, if they are lifted or swung by their forearms.

If you or your child has a dislocated elbow, seek immediate medical attention. Complications can occur if the dislocated elbow pinches or traps the blood vessels and the nerves that serve the lower arm and hand.

A dislocated elbow can usually be realigned without surgery. However, if your elbow is also fractured, you might need surgery.

Our team of specialists and therapists work together to focus on all facets of the body and ensure your individual needs are met.

 

 

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