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    Rehabilitation / Physical Therapy

May 15, 2018

Sports Injuries: Treatment and Recovery with Chiro and Physical Therapy

Recovery with Chiro and Physical Therapy

Whether it’s recreational or professional sports, the possibility of sustaining injuries while playing is always present. Though contact sports like football and basketball increase the chance of getting injured, swimmers, cyclists, and golfers also have their fair share of sports injuries.

First aid is very important to keeping the pain in check and preventing further damage to the affected area. Serious injuries may need

more than just an ice pack. Some may need regular rehab sessions to bring back peak performance while the worst injuries may call for surgery.

The most common sports injuries among professionals are pulled muscles, runner’s knee, shoulder impingement, shin splints, tennis elbow, ankle sprain, and Achilles tendonitis. Though these

rarely require evasive treatment, most may require physical therapy and chiropractic intervention for treatment and recovery.

Treatment will start with questions about your medical history, a physical exam, and other tests relevant to your injury. Thorough evaluation and a correct diagnosis of the injury will also result in providing the right treatment plan.

A chiropractor will check your posture, balance, and spine. A chiropractor will help you relieve tension in your body with manual adjustments to your spine and joints. Faster recovery, improved balance, and better performance can be achieved with regular visits.

Physical therapy will provide targeted exercises to relieve pain and reduce inflammation, after which a reconditioning treatment plan will help improve range of motion, flexibility, strength, and balance. Committing to the physical therapy and rehab can get you back to your game faster and safer.

Yes, enjoying your favorite sport is a great way to keep fit and healthy. However, there are a couple of tips that you should always remember: make sure that you warm up and cool down properly, and don’t overdo yourself and listen to your body.

September 28, 2017

All About Patellar Tendonitis

Knee Pain:

The knee is one of the most vital tendon systems of our body. For athletes, especially those engaged in team sports, the health and well-being of their knee is so important. Their careers are dependent on how long their knees stay injury-free.
In sports, like volleyball and basketball which involve a lot of jumping, the knees are exposed to a myriad of injuries. One of them is patellar tendonitis, commonly known as jumper’s knee.
As its name suggests, jumper’s knee comes from “jumping”. Basketball and volleyball athletes are at risk of suffering from patellar tendonitis. When players dash and go for fast breaks, leap for rebounds and block spikes, dive for loose balls, the knee is always under duress and stress. As a result of all that activity, the patella tendon below the knee cap develops patella tendonitis.
The following are some of the symptoms that you are suffering from jumper’s knee or patellar tendonitis:
1. Gradual increase of pain in the knee with increase in level of activity
2. Patella Tendon feels tender
3. Stiffness in the tendon during morning
4. Pain gets worse whenever you jump, land, run
Jumper’s knee/patellar tendonitis can go beyond just knee pain. Additional stress on the tendon will do further damage and might lead to the whole knee being damaged for life. Athletes with severe jumper’s knee will not only be able to play at peak levels, and may have to refrain from playing again.
To treat jumper’s knee, we have the following advice:
1. Rest your injured knees and refrain from activities that would cause further stress to it.
2. Apply cold compress to the swelling and then warm compress after the swelling is reduced.
3. Always do warm-ups before any activity. Do these warm-up exercises to increase the strength of your knee.
4. Consult a professional therapist on stretching exercises, those which are specifically for the knees.
Do not let jumper’s knee end your athletic career end early, or make you stop playing the game you always loved. Visit Launchfit™ by Clinicube®and we will teach you how to overcome patellar tendonitis!
March 18, 2017

Physical therapy proves as effective as surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome

Physical therapy is as effective as surgery in treating carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a new study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy® (JOSPT®).

Researchers in Spain and the United States report that one year following treatment, patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who received physical therapy achieved results comparable to outcomes for patients who had surgery for this condition. Further, physical therapy patients saw faster improvements at the one-month mark than did patients treated surgically.

Carpal tunnel syndrome causes pain, numbness, and weakness in the wrist and hand. Nearly half of all work-related injuries are linked to this syndrome, which can result from repetitive movements. Although surgery may be considered when the symptoms are severe, more than a third of patients do not return to work within eight weeks after an operation for carpal tunnel syndrome.

The study demonstrates that physical therapy – and particularly a combination of manual therapy of the neck and median nerve and stretching exercises – may be preferable to surgery, certainly as a starting point for treatment.

“Conservative treatment may be an intervention option for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome as a first line of management prior to or instead of surgery,” says lead author César Fernández de las Peñas, PT, PhD, DMSc, with the Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation, and Physical Medicine at Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón, Spain.

Dr. de las Peñas and his fellow researchers studied the cases of 100 women with carpal tunnel syndrome. By random allocation, 50 women were treated with physical therapy and 50 with surgery. Patients assigned to the physical therapy group were treated with manual therapy techniques that focused on the neck and median nerve for 30 minutes, once a week, with stretching exercises at home.

After one month, the patients in the physical therapy group had better hand function during daily activities and better grip strength (also known as pinch strength between the thumb and index finger) than the patients who had surgery. At three, six, and 12 months following treatment, patients in the surgery group were no better than those in the physical therapy group. Both groups showed similar improvements in function and grip strength. Pain also decreased similarly for patients in both groups. The researchers conclude that physical therapy and surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome yield similar benefits one year after treatment. No improvements in cervical range of motion were observed in either patient group.

The researchers caution that because the study only included women from a single hospital, additional research needs to be done to generalize their findings. Further, there are no available data on the most effective dosage for the manual therapy protocol applied.

The study was funded by a research project grant (FIS PI14/ 00364) from the Health Institute Carlos III (PN I+D+I 2014-2017; Spanish Government).

Article: The Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Versus Surgery on Self-reported Function, Cervical Range of Motion, and Pinch Grip Force in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial, César Fernández-de-las-Peñas, PT, PhD, DMSc, Joshua Cleland, PT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT, María Palacios-Ceña, PT, Stella Fuensalida-Novo, PT, Juan A. Pareja, MD, PhD, Cristina Alonso-Blanco, PT, PhD, Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, doi: 10.2519/jospt.2017.7090, published March 2017.